It’s pretty easy to feel anger over such blatant sexism, and it immediately reminded me of some of my own experiences of feeling ignored at times in my own workplace.

But then she said something that struck a really odd chord: “Yeah, it’s supposed to represent artists from the South, but it turns out it’s just a total sausage fest.” Okay, we all get the basic meaning here.

But is she really implying that the men who were invited to exhibit their work were asked to do so on the basis of their genitalia?

And having one of those words appear in the middle of our dinner-date is, um, anti-climatic in just about every sense of the word.

And from a trans-feminist perspective, I would emphasize that what underlies trans-misogyny is nothing more than misogyny itself.

Not to mention that this results in some probably well-intentioned cis women missing out on connecting with lots of beautiful, amazing trans women.

So with that in mind, I have put together some suggestions for cis women on thinking through some basic trans issues, including ideas on approaching trans women in a romantic or intimate context.

Recently, I went on a dinner date with a cis woman that ended a bit awkwardly.

Some of the conversation we shared was nice, we talked about film (fyi – an easy topic to hold my interest, ladies!

Look, I get that it takes some time to work some of these things out, but part of my point is just that making it clear you believe trans women should be included is a good step towards developing meaningful friendship with us.

On the contrary, referring to a bunch of dudes as a “sausage fest” might not be such a cool/sexy/romantic thing to do (regardless of anyone’s actual genital status… I realize there are a wide variety of trans narratives out there, and maybe it could seem like a lot to work through.

One of the awesome things about the queer women’s communities is that I think we tend to be much more open about possibilities for intimate relationships.